Writer’s Quote: Francis Bacon

books

“Read not to contradict and confute; nor to believe and take for granted; nor to find talk and discourse; but to weigh and consider”

“Of studies” by Francis Bacon is an intriguing and solid piece of writing.Today, I was reading this essay and found this quote to be worth sharing here.

Isn’t it true that man is boastful in nature? Haven’t you seen a group of people trying to contradict others?

In this process of their contradiction, they actually want to impose their thought process on others. In fact, they feel that the world is in need of their knowledge and wisdom. So, in order to show that they have read too many books, they seek a path in which they “contradict” and “confute” with others.

We often didn’t realize the true method of studying. For, reading without “meditation” is useless and meaningless.

In the absence of any “contemplation” from the reader, the writer often succeeds in influencing the reader’s mind. Thus, the reader stops thinking and unknowingly his mind started to absorb each and everything of what he reads.

So, what should be the purpose of reading? And what should be the true method of studying?

The great minds never allow a writer to get hold of their “thought process”. Thus, while reading, they never cease to concentrate upon the ideas of the book.

To sum it up, the process of reading and studying is “self-discovery”. The “weighing of facts” and “consideration of ideas” are some of the outcomes of reading.

Nevertheless, reading “sharpens our skills” and helps us to go about our life business in a more capable way.

Francis Bacon some quick facts:

English philosopher, statesman, jurist, orator and author, born on January 22, 1561 and died on April 9,1626.

This is my submission to Silver Threading writer’s quote Wednesday.

writers quote

 

 

 

 

 

In order to read more quotes,  please visit her blog. She is hosting a great blogging event there.

 

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